brandingtheuspresidents:

Thirty-Fifth President: John F. Kennedy (1961-1963)
This photo depicts NASA Deputy Administrator Robert Seamans, Dr. Wernher von Braun and President Kennedy at Cape Canaveral. Dr. Wernher von Braun explains the Saturn Launch System to President John F. Kennedy. 

In a time of uncertainty at home and abroad, an American president proposes bold new steps in the exploration of space.He calls for “longer strides” which “may hold the key to our future here on Earth.” He touts the potential of “even more exciting and ambitious exploration of space, perhaps beyond the moon, perhaps to the very end of the solar system itself.” The year is 1961. The president is John F. Kennedy. But the words ring true today, as NASA once again aims for new frontiers with the Vision for Space Exploration.Kennedy’s “Special Message to Congress on Urgent National Needs” came on May 25, just three weeks after Mercury astronaut Alan B. Shepard became the first American in space. Delivered at the height of the Cold War with the Soviet Union, the speech is best known for Kennedy’s audacious challenge to NASA and America: "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth." 
Read more here: nasa.gov

brandingtheuspresidents:

Thirty-Fifth President: John F. Kennedy (1961-1963)

This photo depicts NASA Deputy Administrator Robert Seamans, Dr. Wernher von Braun and President Kennedy at Cape Canaveral. Dr. Wernher von Braun explains the Saturn Launch System to President John F. Kennedy. 

In a time of uncertainty at home and abroad, an American president proposes bold new steps in the exploration of space.

He calls for “longer strides” which “may hold the key to our future here on Earth.” He touts the potential of “even more exciting and ambitious exploration of space, perhaps beyond the moon, perhaps to the very end of the solar system itself.” 

The year is 1961. The president is John F. Kennedy. But the words ring true today, as NASA once again aims for new frontiers with the Vision for Space Exploration.

Kennedy’s “Special Message to Congress on Urgent National Needs” came on May 25, just three weeks after Mercury astronaut Alan B. Shepard became the first American in space. Delivered at the height of the Cold War with the Soviet Union, the speech is best known for Kennedy’s audacious challenge to NASA and America: 

"I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth." 

Read more here: nasa.gov

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.”
Born in 1818 in Massachusetts, Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one, and received worldwide fame and a gold medal from King Frederick VI of Denmark.
She later became the first professor of astronomy at Vassar College, where she is remembered as emphasizing the importance of observation to her students, often asking, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.”

Born in 1818 in Massachusetts, Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one, and received worldwide fame and a gold medal from King Frederick VI of Denmark.

She later became the first professor of astronomy at Vassar College, where she is remembered as emphasizing the importance of observation to her students, often asking, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?”